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Monday, August 15, 2022

NAACP Centennial: Bible Steps Down, Mack Praises Black Press

NAACP President James Bible announced that he is stepping down during the NAACP’s Centennial Celebration. Photo by Carl Murray, Seattle Photography, Inc.

Last Saturday, the Seattle/King County NAACP celebrated 100 years of service at their Centennial Celebration. The event — which featured NAACP President/CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous, Bishop John Hurst Adams, former Seattle/King County NAACP President Carl Mack and was emceed by KOMO TV News Anchor Connie Thompson – drew a capacity crowd.

In addition to honoring the 100-year legacy of the Seattle/King County Branch, Judge Donald Haley (Ret.), Judge Charles V. Johnson (Ret.), and NAACP President Emeritus Lacy Steele were honored for providing over 50 years of volunteer service to the Greater Seattle area through their work with the NAACP.

During the event, current Seattle/King County NAACP President James Bible announced that he was stepping down as president and that current Seattle/King County NAACP Vice President Gerald Hankerson would be assuming the role of president.

Outgoing NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous addresses the capacity crowd. Photo by Carl Murray, Seattle Photography, Inc.
Outgoing NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous addresses the capacity crowd. Photo by Carl Murray, Seattle Photography, Inc.

During his remarks, Mack saluted the evenings’ honorees and all of the volunteers who helped the Branch to be recognized by the national organization as the number one branch in the country during his tenure as president. Mack also acknowledged the role that the Black Press played in helping the branch win the NAACP’s 2004 Class 1-A Thalheimer Award.

“We could not have done many of the things that we were able to accomplish if it had not been for the support of the Black Press,” said Mack. “Winning the Thalheimer Award would not have been possible if it had not been for the support that we received from Chris Bennett and the staff at The Seattle Medium and KRIZ.”

Bishop John Hurst Adams. Photo by Carl Murray, Seattle Photography, Inc.
Bishop John Hurst Adams. Photo by Carl Murray, Seattle Photography, Inc.

Bishop John Hurst Adams, who was pastor at First A.M.E. Church of Seattle during the 1960’s, talked about the “turbulent 60s” here in Seattle. Bishop Adams along with members of the NAACP and other community leaders were catalyst for change during 60’s that brought about open housing laws and other civil rights advancements to the area.

Adams, by most accounts, had one of the most profound statements of the evening. As he talked about accountability, Adams stated, “If a person is only accountable to themselves and nobody else, they will eventually spin out of control.”

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